I-360 Green Card Petition for Special Immigrants

The I-360 Petition is for foreign nationals to begin the Green Card application as a “Special Immigrant,” who falls in to a special category. The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) is very well known in relation to the I-360, because battered and abused spouses can readjust their status and gain permanent residence through this process. There are many people who can use the I-360 to adjust their status, so this process is not solely used for victims of domestic abuse. Some of the other people who may qualify include: workers for recognized religious organizations foreign medical graduates who have lived in the United States for a long time longtime U.S. government employees certain retired officers of employees of international organizations who lived in the U.S. a long time juveniles dependent on U.S. courts people who served honorably, on active U.S. military duty, for 12 years or more after October 15, 1978 Panama Canal Treaty employees NATO civilian employees, and people coming to work in the U.S. as broadcasters for the International Broadcasting Bureau. Afghani or Iraqi nationals who supported the U.S. Armed Forces as a translator Iraqi nationals who worked for or on behalf of the U.S. government in Iraq Afghan nationals who worked for or on behalf of the U.S. government in Afghanistan. Each category has its own specific requirements regarding what the forms require and what documentation you must present. The I-360 petition is different than many other petitions. Most people are familiar with the Violence Against Women Act option to file under this type of petition, but there are many other people who can use the...

Asylum & Refugee Status

Share What’s the difference between Aslyum and Refugee status? Both are special legal protections to people who are fearful of the situation in their home country. The only difference between asylum and refugee status is where you physically are when you apply. If you are still outside of the United States, you must apply for refugee status. If you are already inside of the United States on a work visa, student visa, or if you arrived illegally, you can apply for asylum status. Asylum can be granted to people who live in the United States and are not able to return to their home country because of persecution or a legitimate fear of persecution. Persecution can fall into many categories, including race, religious affiliation, and nationality, or being part of a social group or political party, or based on your personal political opinions. Anyone can apply for asylum, regardless of his or her immigration status. That means that even if you came to the United States illegally, you could potentially qualify for asylum. To apply for asylum, use the USCIS Form I-589 – The Application for Asylum and for Withholding of Removal form. There are many strict requirements that must be met to achieve refugee or asylum status. Including: You can’t go back to your home country because you were persecuted in the past, or you have a legitimate fear that you will face persecution if you return. The basis for the persecution that you faced or will face in your country has to do with one of these five things: your race, nationality, religion, your political opinion, or...